networkx.DiGraph.update

DiGraph.update(edges=None, nodes=None)

Update the graph using nodes/edges/graphs as input.

Like dict.update, this method takes a graph as input, adding the graph’s noes and edges to this graph. It can also take two inputs: edges and nodes. Finally it can take either edges or nodes. To specify only nodes the keyword nodes must be used.

The collections of edges and nodes are treated similarly to the add_edges_from/add_nodes_from methods. When iterated, they should yield 2-tuples (u, v) or 3-tuples (u, v, datadict).

Parameters:
  • edges (Graph object, collection of edges, or None) – The first parameter can be a graph or some edges. If it has attributes nodes and edges, then it is taken to be a Graph-like object and those attributes are used as collections of nodes and edges to be added to the graph. If the first parameter does not have those attributes, it is treated as a collection of edges and added to the graph. If the first argument is None, no edges are added.
  • nodes (collection of nodes, or None) – The second parameter is treated as a collection of nodes to be added to the graph unless it is None. If edges is None and nodes is None an exception is raised. If the first parameter is a Graph, then nodes is ignored.

Examples

>>> G = nx.path_graph(5)
>>> G.update(nx.complete_graph(range(4,10)))
>>> from itertools import combinations
>>> edges = ((u, v, {'power': u * v})
...          for u, v in combinations(range(10, 20), 2)
...          if u * v < 225)
>>> nodes = [1000]  # for singleton, use a container
>>> G.update(edges, nodes)

Notes

It you want to update the graph using an adjacency structure it is straightforward to obtain the edges/nodes from adjacency. The following examples provide common cases, your adjacency may be slightly different and require tweaks of these examples.

>>> # dict-of-set/list/tuple
>>> adj = {1: {2, 3}, 2: {1, 3}, 3: {1, 2}}
>>> e = [(u, v) for u, nbrs in adj.items() for v in  nbrs]
>>> G.update(edges=e, nodes=adj)
>>> DG = nx.DiGraph()
>>> # dict-of-dict-of-attribute
>>> adj = {1: {2: 1.3, 3: 0.7}, 2: {1: 1.4}, 3: {1: 0.7}}
>>> e = [(u, v, {'weight': d}) for u, nbrs in adj.items()
...      for v, d in nbrs.items()]
>>> DG.update(edges=e, nodes=adj)
>>> # dict-of-dict-of-dict
>>> adj = {1: {2: {'weight': 1.3}, 3: {'color': 0.7, 'weight':1.2}}}
>>> e = [(u, v, {'weight': d}) for u, nbrs in adj.items()
...      for v, d in nbrs.items()]
>>> DG.update(edges=e, nodes=adj)
>>> # predecessor adjacency (dict-of-set)
>>> pred = {1: {2, 3}, 2: {3}, 3: {3}}
>>> e = [(v, u) for u, nbrs in pred.items() for v in nbrs]
>>> # MultiGraph dict-of-dict-of-dict-of-attribute
>>> MDG = nx.MultiDiGraph()
>>> adj = {1: {2: {0: {'weight': 1.3}, 1: {'weight': 1.2}}},
...        3: {2: {0: {'weight': 0.7}}}}
>>> e = [(u, v, ekey, d) for u, nbrs in adj.items()
...      for v, keydict in nbrs.items()
...      for ekey, d in keydict.items()]
>>> MDG.update(edges=e)

See also

add_edges_from()
add multiple edges to a graph
add_nodes_from()
add multiple nodes to a graph